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Search Results 0 to 8 of about 9 (some duplicates have been removed)
science fiction and science fact. a giant robot made its debut in tokyo. people can control it either by sitting inside or with a smartphone. the four meter tall robot appeared at a media event at the national museum of emerging science of innovation. a group of artists and robot engineers spent two years developing it. an operator in the cockpit can manipulate the robot's fingers using a special kind of glove. developer and artist koguro kurata says he worked on the giant creation as a hobby. >> translator: if you are inspired to make something similar to this, please do so without hesitation. it can even be a self-assembly model. >> the robot will be on display in the museum through december 10th. >>> that's all for this edition of "newsline." i'm catherine kobayashi in tokyo. we'll
. >> warner: and is the grand canyon 60 million years older than we've long thought? we ask science correspondent miles o'brien. >> brown: that's all ahead on tonight's newshour. >> major funding for the pbs newshour has been provided by: >> and by bnsf railway. and with the ongoing support of these institutions and foundations. and... this program was made possible by the corporation for public broadcasting. and by contributions to your pbs station from viewers like you. thank you. >> warner: washington's clock ticked another day closer today to automatic tax hikes and spending cuts, the so-called "fiscal cliff". the president took to the road, while republicans warned there's a deadlock in efforts to reach a deficit deal. >> now, of course, santa delivers everywhere. i've been keeping my own naughty and nice lists for washington. >> warner: the president chose a seasonal setting, a toy factory in hatfield, pennsylvania, and holiday imagery to press again for extending tax cuts for the middle class. >> if congress does nothing, every family in america will see their income taxes au
science, technology, and improved economic performance and financial literacy in the 21st century. and with the ongoing support of these institutions and foundations. and... this program was made possible by the corporation for public broadcasting. and by contributions to your pbs station from viewers like you. thank you. >> ifill: house republicans today offered their counter- offer to the president's plan for a deal both sides say is needed to avoid year-end tax increases. the move was the latest volley in an increasingly tense face- off between the two branches of government. >> with 28 days left to come to a deal on the nation's fiscal cliff, the white house is holding firm on its proposal to raise taxes on the wealthy. spokesman jay carney. >> the obstacle remains at this point the refusal to acknowledge by republican leaders that there is no deal that achieves the kind of balance that is cessy withut raising rates on the top 2% wealthiest americans. the math simply does not add up. >> ifill: the white house proposes raising $1.6 trillion in taxes over ten years, imposing hig
on the underlying technology. is this really cool technology, is it promoting the progress of science, is society better off because of that technology. it should not be based on the owner of that particular technology. >> reporter: regulators are holding a workshop next week to look at the behavior of these companies. the workshops are expected to shine a light on the controversial practice. sylvia hall, "n.b.r.," washington. >> susie: another major international bank could soon pay up to settle allegations of price-fixing on a key interest rate. swiss bank u.b.s. is expected to settle charges of rigging "libor-rates" as soon as next week with regulators in the u.s. and britain. u.b.s. is not the first bank to settle charges for manipulating the rate that affects everything from credit cards, to state governments. last summer barclays paid almost half a billion dollars. >> tom: the major stock indices were weighed down as u.s. factories reported less business last month. after starting out the session with a small rally, the s&p 500 fell into the red by mid-day. it finished down 0.5%. trading vo
that was done, she looks up at me and she goes, "baby! when'd you get here?" when science and medicine couldn't bring my mother back to me, these hymns, these songs of faith that she shared with me, were the things that we shared together. ♪ >> reporter: according to armstrong, the choir sings to bring glory to god. and perhaps nowhere is that more evident than in their signature song, beautiful savior, an arrangement done by christiansen. >> that i think has been a song that can epitomize and has been a model for us throughout the years, why do we do this? we sing praise to god. glory and honor, praise, adoration, now and forevermore be thine. that is the focus of our work. >> reporter: when everything falls into place, armstrong says it's a spiritual experience. ♪ >> some people go to prayer and do that, but you know, still small voices and burning bushes don't seem to work with me. you know? but in the minute when that chord locks and we've been struggling with it, and it finally works. it's as if, yeah, god is there. >> reporter: it's an experience he hopes gets transmitted to the aud
appleman, whose creativity spans a long life filled with verse, fiction, philosophy, science, religion, and above all, moments of every day experience captured like the glint of the sun sparkling through a crystal glass. just take a look at a sample of his legacy -- "darwin," "apes and angeles," "darwin's ark," "in the twelfth year of the war," "open doorways," and this, my favorite -- "summer love and surf," about the joys and wonders of loving and living. his latest book of poems is "perfidious proverbs." a fellow poet said that to watch philip appleman "sling words is to be richly regaled." i quite agree. welcome, philip. >> wonderful to be here, bill. >> i have long thought of poetry as music to be heard best in the voice of the composer. so let's go right to some of your poems. >> good. i love it. >> here's one of my favorites. and i think it's one of your favorites, too. "eve." tell me about that poem. >> 20 years ago, i published a book called "let there be light." it was a series of satires on various biblical stories. and eve being one of the first came out at the head of the
provided by: >> bnsf railway. >> and by the alfred p. sloan foundation. supporting science, technology, and improved economic performance and financial literacy in the 21st century. and with the ongoing support of these institutions and foundations. and... this program was made possible by the corporation for public broadcasting. and by contributions to your pbs station from viewers like you. thank you. captioning sponsored by macneil/lehrer productions captioned by media access grp at wgbh access.wgbh.org
Search Results 0 to 8 of about 9 (some duplicates have been removed)